There is nothing wrong with secession and everything wrong with a tyrannical federal government.

By Olddog

Every time I open an email and read about how deeply they love America and cannot understand why anyone would want to leave it, I want to puke. How can anyone have obtained the age of reason, and remain ignorant of the original intent of the founders and their justification for keeping the States sovereign, while constructing a limited federal government? Also, how can anyone capable of picking their nose not see how America has been subjected to the most tyrannical abuse of power ever imagined?

Look at it this way; we have all been subjected to a massive and effective brain washing all of our life, that makes it a sin to not love America. But, just what is America, but either a land mass, or a few hundred million people, or 50 sovereign States? I suppose there will be several answers from the dull and ignorant public, but the original intent was to form a family of States who retained the power to govern their selves, and their citizens, but had committed to be subjected to certain restrictions of conduct between their selves, and a federal government was the mediator with the bottom line. How simple is that?

How hard is it to understand that the term “We the People” was only the founding Fathers, and not the whole damn country. Who in their right mind would accept being born subject to an agreement they knew nothing about?

That is stupid to say the least. The people of each State were born in subjection to the State they were born in, and the State had made a contract with other States which was to be administered by the federal government.

It was not until much later that the fourteenth amendment made everyone dual citizens owning allegiance to both the State of their Birth, and the Feds.

No one can be sure now, but for all of my life I understood I could move any damn place I wanted without asking permission from any body. Now, there is no single person alive who can memorize all of the laws we are subjected too, and I would not be surprised to learn that this letter is illegal. (I could care less) because, in my heart I am not subject to anyone but God. That’s the spirit our founders had, and I don’t give a shit who disagrees. Personally, I don’t need to be forced to obey certain ethical laws; I do so because I want to.

If the average person would start thinking of their self as a State citizen instead of an American, it would go a long way in understanding what I am trying to say here. I’m a Hoosier by birth, and in my mind I have divorced Indiana and married North Carolina. The federal government is just a bully I have not the power to make leave me alone.

In the first place the feds were not supposed to have anything to do with the people; they were the enforcers of certain rules of conduct between the states, period! They should have no contact with the sovereign citizens of each state.

Look up the history of how the fourteenth amendment was rammed through in the dead of night by the Republican party. Too bad no one had the balls to complain. Another thing each citizen should do is read something besides a comic book or the sport page of their local News Liars. How about this list of books instead!

No Treason: The Constitution of No Authority, by Lysander Spooner

Our enemy, The State, by Albert J. Nock

War is a Racket, by Brigadier General Smedley D. Butler

Hamilton’s Curse, By Thomas J. DiLorenzo

Separating School and State, By Sheldon Richman

The Globalization of Poverty and the New World Order, by Michel Chossudovsky

The tyranny of Good Intentions, By Paul C. Roberts

The Federalist Papers                      http://www.constitution.org/fed/federa00.htm  

Alexander Hamilton James Madison John Jay

The text of this version is primarily taken from the first collected 1788 “McLean edition”, but spelling and punctuation have been modernized, and some glaring errors — mainly printer’s lapses — have been corrected. The main heads have also been taken from that edition and a few later ones, except where the head was something like “The Same Subject Continued” we have repeated the previous heading and appended “(continued)”, so that each document can better stand alone. We have been guided by the excellent edition by Jacob E. Cooke, Wesleyan University Press, 1961. The footnotes are those of the authors, except where the original edition used a variety of special typographical symbols for superscripts, we use numerals. Editors’s footnotes are indicated by being preceded by the letter “E”. The original typography used for emphasis, such as all caps or italics, has been used here. We have tried to identify the date of earliest appearance in a newspaper. The newspapers were theIndependent Journal [J], the New-York Packet [P], and the Daily Advertiser [A], all based in New York, shown preceding the date. Nos. 78-85 actually first appeared May 28, 1788, in a bound volume published by J. and A. McLean, Federalist II. We have followed the consensus of scholars on attribution of each paper to its primary author, James Madison [M], John Jay [J], or Alexander Hamilton [H], which is shown following the date. Please email comments or corrections tojon.roland@constitution.org.


Contents

1 J 1787 Oct 27 H General Introduction
2 J 1787 Oct 31 J Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
3 J 1787 Nov 3 J Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)
4 J 1787 Nov 7 J Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)
5 J 1787 Nov 10 J Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (continued)
6 J 1787 Nov 14 H Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
7 J 1787 Nov 15 H Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States (continued) and Particular Causes Enumerated
8 P 1787 Nov 20 H Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
9 J 1787 Nov 21 H The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
10 A 1787 Nov 22 M The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (continued)
11 J 1787 Nov 24 H The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
12 P 1787 Nov 27 H The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue
13 J 1787 Nov 28 H Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
14 P 1787 Nov 30 M Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered
15 J 1787 Dec 1 H Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
16 P 1787 Dec 4 H Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)
17 J 1787 Dec 5 H Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)
18 P 1787 Dec 7 M Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)
19 J 1787 Dec 8 M Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)
20 P 1787 Dec 11 M Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (continued)
21 J 1787 Dec 12 H Other Defects of the Present Confederation
22 P 1787 Dec 14 H Other Defects of the Present Confederation (continued)
23 P 1787 Dec 18 H Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
24 J 1787 Dec 19 H Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
25 P 1787 Dec 21 H Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (continued)
26 J 1787 Dec 22 H Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
27 P 1787 Dec 25 H Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (continued)
28 J 1787 Dec 26 H Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered (continued)
29 J 1788 Jan 9 H Concerning the Militia
30 P 1787 Dec 28 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation
31 P 1788 Jan 1 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
32 J 1788 Jan 2 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
33 J 1788 Jan 2 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
34 J 1788 Jan 5 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
35 J 1788 Jan 5 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
36 P 1788 Jan 8 H Concerning the General Power of Taxation (continued)
37 A 1788 Jan 11 M Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
38 J 1788 Jan 12 M The Same Subject Continued, and the Incoherence of the Objections to the New Plan Exposed
39 J 1788 Jan 16 M Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
40 P 1788 Jan 18 M On the Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
41 J 1788 Jan 19 M General View of the Powers Conferred by The Constitution
42 P 1788 Jan 22 M The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered
43 J 1788 Jan 23 M The Powers Conferred by the Constitution Further Considered (continued)
44 P 1788 Jan 25 M Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
45 J 1788 Jan 26 M Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered
46 P 1788 Jan 29 M The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
47 J 1788 Jan 30 M The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
48 P 1788 Feb 1 M These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other
49 J 1788 Feb 2 M Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention
50 P 1788 Feb 5 M Periodical Appeals to the People Considered
51 J 1788 Feb 6 M The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
52 P 1788 Feb 8 M The House of Representatives
53 J 1788 Feb 9 M The House of Representatives (continued)
54 P 1788 Feb 12 M Apportionment of Members of the House of Representatives Among the States
55 J 1788 Feb 13 M The Total Number of the House of Representatives
56 J 1788 Feb 16 M The Total Number of the House of Representatives (continued)
57 P 1788 Feb 19 M The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation
58 J 1788 Feb 20 M Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered
59 P 1788 Feb 22 H Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
60 J 1788 Feb 23 H Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (continued)
61 P 1788 Feb 26 H Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members (continued)
62 J 1788 Feb 27 M The Senate
63 J 1788 Mar 1 M The Senate (continued)
64 J 1788 Mar 5 J The Powers of the Senate
65 P 1788 Mar 7 H The Powers of the Senate (continued)
66 J 1788 Mar 8 H Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
67 P 1788 Mar 11 H The Executive Department
68 J 1788 Mar 12 H The Mode of Electing the President
69 P 1788 Mar 14 H The Real Character of the Executive
70 J 1788 Mar 15 H The Executive Department Further Considered
71 P 1788 Mar 18 H The Duration in Office of the Executive
72 J 1788 Mar 19 H The Same Subject Continued, and Re-Eligibility of the Executive Considered
73 P 1788 Mar 21 H The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
74 P 1788 Mar 25 H The Command of the Military and Naval Forces, and the Pardoning Power of the Executive
75 J 1788 Mar 26 H The Treaty-Making Power of the Executive
76 P 1788 Apr 1 H The Appointing Power of the Executive
77 J 1788 Apr 2 H The Appointing Power Continued and Other Powers of the Executive Considered
78 J 1788 Jun 14 H The Judiciary Department
79 J 1788 Jun 18 H The Judiciary Continued
80 J 1788 Jun 21 H The Powers of the Judiciary
81 J 1788 Jun 25
28
H The Judiciary Continued, and the Distribution of the Judicial Authority
82 J 1788 Jul 2 H The Judiciary Continued
83 J 1788 Jul 5
9
12
H The Judiciary Continued in Relation to Trial by Jury
84 J 1788 JulAug 16
26
9
H Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
85 J 1788 Aug 13
16
H Concluding Remarks

These are just a starter to get your mind headed in the right direction, but if you really are hurting inside and want to know what has really been going on in America, you are going to have to do a lot more reading than playing. Contrary to what every one else is saying, it’s not too late to take back our freedom if you can muster up the balls to fight back and study. All it would really take is to string up a bunch of International Investment Bankers, and confiscate their wealth.

Olddog

 

 

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